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Showing posts from May, 2009

Transformation and a Biological Analogy for Agents of Change

WOW! I just read this post and had to share it - This article is entitled, Biological Analogy for Agents of Change, and was posted on 2009-04-07, by John Ringland. This powerful analogy demonstrates how painful the process of personal transformation can be, but how beautiful it is when the final outcome has been achieved. I am not sure I can add any comments to this - so I'll let you read and come to your own conclusions.

Read the original article here: http://www.newciv.org/nl/newslog.php/_v550/__show_article/_a000550-000077.htm

It can be difficult being an agent of change. Here is an anology to help you understand what it means to be an agent of change and how to go about it effectively. Below are some quotes about caterpillar / butterfly anatomy and the vital role of imaginal cells.For the most part, the cells that comprise the caterpillar are not the cells that will become the adult (butterfly or moth). The caterpillar has imaginal discs within its body. Different clusters of th…

Study finds that Smokers Need Anger "Solutions" to Quit

Anger management may help smokers - originally posted on IrishHealth.com.
[Posted: Sun 26/04/2009 by Olivia Fens]

Anger management classes may help smokers to quit, a new study has indicated.Researchers from the University of California looked at the reactions of people playing a computer game – once while wearing a nicotine patch and once while wearing a placebo (fake) patch.The study found that when the participants were not wearing a nicotine patch, they were more likely to react angrily.The researchers believe this is because nicotine affects the part of the brain that controls emotion.“Moreover, the findings suggest that nicotine may critically regulate brain areas that are involved in the inhibition of negative emotions such as anger,” the researchers said.“Behavioural treatments, such as anger management training, may aid smoking cessation efforts in anger provoking situations that increase withdrawal and tobacco cravings,” they concluded. The study was published in the Behaviou…